Friday, March 29

Join Us!

Detail from the painting "The Press Gang" by Johnston.
The Acasta is looking for quality reenactors
to portray English sailors circa 1800-1812
Our organization seeks to educate via a series of first person activities designed to demonstrate the real lives of sailors as they go about their business etc. Landing Parties, Surveying Crews, Recruitment Drives, Press Gangs, Shore Leave... these are but a few of the activities that our crew will undertake whilst encamped at an event. 

First, be sure to read the Clothing guidelines for Acasta Sailors

Then check out our Philosophy

If these sound like a good fit for you, then you may have what it takes to be an Acasta!

NO CLOTHING? NO PROBLEM... 
We might just be able to help you out in that respect... Email Albert Roberts today to find out more about joining the crew at:
Want some cheater's hints at how to get in good with the officers? 

Here's what we're looking for in new members. Someone who is motivated to learn and share their knowledge, someone who knows about the position that they're portraying, someone who can act in the manner befitting the station that they portray. First-person and acting skills (no 'Monty Python' accents need apply). And don't forget to salute!

Thursday, March 28

VOLUNTEERS.

Using the Opaque Projector to shoot the letters onto the canvas
A new project has been undertaken up on deck. Capt. Freymann has employed the sailmaker and a few of the men with steady hands to create a canvas banner as an advertisement for Volunteers. This banner will be used the next time we go ashore to recruit.

After sick call at the mast this morning, I stood over them and watched as they sketched out the letters based on what the Captain had written, then, with tiny brushes and black paint in hand, they went about painting in the letters.

After the letters have been transfer'd in pencil, they are painted in
The pencil'd letters and side stitch in detail
A detail of some of the finished, painted lettering.

Wednesday, March 27

The Articles of War

THE ARTICLES OF WAR 1757

1. All commanders, captains, and officers, in or belonging to any of His Majesty's ships or vessels of war, shall cause the public worship of Almighty God, according to the liturgy of the Church of England established by law, to be solemnly, orderly and reverently performed in their respective ships; and shall take care that prayers and preaching, by the chaplains in holy orders of the respective ships, be performed diligently; and that the Lord's day be observed according to law.

2. All flag officers, and all persons in or belonging to His Majesty's ships or vessels of war, being guilty of profane oaths, cursings, execrations, drunkenness, uncleanness, or other scandalous actions, in derogation of God's honour, and corruption of good manners, shall incur such punishment as a court martial shall think fit to impose, and as the nature and degree of their offence shall deserve.

3. If any officer, mariner, soldier, or other person of the fleet, shall give, hold, or entertain intelligence to or with any enemy or rebel, without leave from the king's majesty, or the lord high admiral, or the commissioners for executing the office of lord high admiral, commander in chief, or his commanding officer, every such person so offending, and being thereof convicted by the sentence of a court martial, shall be punished with death.

4. If any letter of message from any enemy or rebel, be conveyed to any officer, mariner, or soldier or other in the fleet, and the said officer, mariner, or soldier, or other as aforesaid, shall not, within twelve hours, having opportunity so to do, acquaint his superior or a commanding officer, or if any superior officer being acquainted therewith, shall not in convenient time reveal the same to the commander in chief of the squadron, every such person so offending, and being convicted thereof by the sentence of the court martial, shall be punished with death, or such other punishment as the nature and degree of the offense shall deserve, and the court martial shall impose.

5. All spies, and all persons whatsoever, who shall come, or be found, in the nature of spies, to bring or deliver any seducing letters or messages from any enemy or rebel, or endeavor to corrupt any captain, officer, mariner, or other in the fleet, to betray his trust, being convicted of any such offense by the sentence of the court martial, shall be punished with death, or such other punishment, as the nature and degree of the offence shall deserve, and the court martial shall impose.

6. No person in the fleet shall receive an enemy or rebel with money, victuals, powder, shot, arms, ammunition, or any other supplies whatsoever, directly or indirectly, upon pain of death, or such other punishment as the court martial shall think fit to impose, and as the nature and degree of the crime shall deserve.

7. All the papers, charter parties, bills of lading, passports, and other writings whatsoever, that shall be taken, seized, or found aboard any ship or ships which shall be surprized or taken as prize, shall be duly preserved, and the very originals shall by the commanding officer of the ship which shall take such prize, be sent entirely, and without fraud, to the court of the admiralty, or such other court of commissioners, as shall be authorized to determine whether such prize be lawful capture, there to be viewed, made use of, and proceeded upon according to law, upon pain that every person offending herein, shall forfeit and lose his share of the capture, and shall suffer such further punishment, as the nature and degree of his offense shall be found to deserve, and the court martial shall impose.

8. No person in or belonging to the fleet shall take out of any prize, or ship seized for prize, any money, plate, or goods, unless it shall be necessary for the better securing thereof, or for the necessary use and service of any of His Majesty's ships or vessels of war, before the same be adjudged lawful prize in some admiralty court; but the full and entire account of the whole, without embezzlement, shall be brought in, and judgment passed entirely upon the whole without fraud, upon pain that every person offending hemin shall forfeit and lose his share of the capture, and suffer such further punishment as shall be imposed by a court martial, or such court of admiralty, according to the nature and degree of the offense.

9. If any ship or vessel be taken as prize, none of the officers, mariners, or other persons on board her, shall be stripped of their clothes, or in any sort pillaged, beaten, or evil-intreated, upon the pain that the person or persons so offending, shall be liable to such punishment as a court martial shall think fit to inflict.

10. Every flag officer, captain and commander in the fleet, who, upon signal or order of fight, or sight of any ship or ships which it may be his duty to engage, or who, upon likelihood of engagement, shall not make the necessary preparations for fight, and shall not in his own person, and according to his place, encourage the inferior officers and men to fight courageously, shall suffer death, or such other punishment, as from the nature and degree of the offence a court martial shall deem him to deserve; and if any person in the fleet shall treacherously or cowardly yield or cry for quarter, every person so offending, and being convicted thereof by the sentence of a court martial, shall suffer death.

11. Every person in the fleet, who shall not duly observe the orders of the admiral, flag officer, commander of any squadron or division, or other his superior officer, for assailing, joining battle with, or making defense against any fleet, squadron, or ship, or shall not obey the orders of his superior officer as aforesaid in the time of action, to the best of his power, or shall not use all possible endeavours to put the same effectually into execution, every person so offending, and being convicted thereof by the sentence of the court martial, shall suffer death, or such other punishment, as from the nature and degree of the offence a court martial shall deem him to deserve.

12. Every person in the fleet, who through cowardice, negligence, or disaffection, shall in time of action withdraw or keep back, or not come into the fight or engagement, or shall not do his utmost to take or destroy every ship which it shall be his duty to engage, and to assist and relieve all and every of His Majesty's ships, or those of his allies, which it shall be his duty to assist and relieve, every such person so offending, and being convicted thereof by the sentence of a court martial, shall suffer death.

13. Every person in the fleet, who though cowardice, negligence, or disaffection, shall forbear to pursue the chase of any enemy, pirate or rebel, beaten or flying; or shall not relieve or assist a known friend in view to the utmost of his power; being convicted of any such offense by the sentence of a court martial, shall suffer death.

14. If when action, or any service shall be commanded, any person in the fleet shall presume or to delay or discourage the said action or service, upon pretence of arrears of wages, or upon any pretence whatsoever, every person so offending, being convicted thereof by the sentence of the court martial, shall suffer death, or such other punishment, as from the nature and degree of the offense a court martial shall deem him to deserve.

15. Every person in or belonging to the fleet, who shall desert or entice others so to do, shall suffer death, or such other punishment as the circumstances of the offense shall deserve, and a court martial shall judge fit: and if any commanding officer of any of His Majesty's ships or vessels of war shall receive or entertain a deserter from any other of His Majesty's ships or vessels, after discovering him to be such deserter, and shall not with all convenient speed give notice to the captain of the ship or vessel to which such deserter belongs; or if the said ships or vessels are at any considerable distance from each other, to the secretary of the admiralty, or to the commander in chief; every person so offending, and being convicted thereof by the sentence of the court martial, shall be cashiered.

16. The officers and seamen of all ships appointed for convoy and guard of merchant ships, or of any other, shall diligently attend upon that charge, without delay, according to their instructions in that behalf; and whosoever shall be faulty therein, and shall not faithfully perform their duty, and defend the ships and goods in their convoy, without either diverting to other parts or occasions, or refusing or neglecting to fight in their defence, if they be assailed, or running away cowardly, and submitting the ships in their convoy to peril and hazard; or shall demand or exact any money or other reward from any merchant or master for convoying any ships or vessels entrusted to their care, or shall misuse the masters or mariners thereof; shall be condemned to make reparation of the damage to the merchants, owners, and others, as the court of admiralty shall adjudge, and also be punished criminally according to the quality of their offences, be it by pains of death, or other punishment, according as shall be adjudged fit by the court martial.

17. If any captain, commander, or other officer of any of His Majesty's ships or vessels, shall receive on board, or permit to be received on board such ship or vessel, any goods or merchandises whatsoever, other than for the sole use of the ship or vessel, except gold, silver, or jewels, and except the goods and merchandisers belonging to any merchant, or other ship or vessel which may be shipwrecked, or in imminent danger of being shipwrecked, either on the high seas, or in any port, creek, or harbour, in order to the preserving them for their proper owners, and except such goods or merchandisers as he shall at any time be ordered to take or receive on board by order of the lord high admiral of Great Britain, or the commissioners for executing the office of lord high admiral for the time being; every person so offending, being convicted thereof by the sentence of the court martial shall be cashiered, and be for ever afterwards rendered incapable to serve in any place or office in the naval service of His Majesty, his heirs and successors.

18. If any person in or belonging to the fleet shall make or endeavor to make any mutinous assembly upon any pretence whatsoever, every person offending herein, and being convicted thereof by the sentence of the court martial, shall suffer death: and if any person in or belonging to the fleet shall utter any words of sedition or mutiny, he shall suffer death, or such other punishment as a court martial shall deem him to deserve: and if any officer, mariner, or soldier on or belonging to the fleet, shall behave himself with contempt to his superior officer, being in the execution of his office, he shall be punished according to the nature of his offence by the judgment of a court martial.

19. If any person in the fleet shall conceal any traitorous or mutinous practice or design, being convicted thereof by the sentence of a court martial, he shall suffer death, or any other punishment as a court martial shall think fit; and if any person, in or belonging to the fleet, shall conceal any traitorous or mutinous words spoken by any, to the prejudice of His Majesty or government, or any words, practice, or design, tending to the hindrance of the service, and shall not forthwith reveal the same to the commanding officer, or being present at any mutiny or sedition, shall not use his utmost endeavours to suppress the same, he shall be punished as a court martial shall think he deserves.

20. If any person in the fleet shall find cause of complaint of the unwholesomeness of the victual, or upon other just ground, he shall quietly make the same known to his superior, or captain, or commander in chief, as the occasion may deserve, that such present remedy may be had as the matter may require; and the said superior, captain, or commander in chief, shall, as far as he is able, cause the same to be presently remedied; and no person in the fleet, upon any such or other pretence, shall attempt to stir up any disturbance, upon pain of such punishment, as a court martial shall think fit to inflict, according to the degree of the offence.

21. If any officer, mariner, soldier or other person in the fleet, shall strike any of his superior officers, or draw, or offer to draw, or lift up any weapon against him, being in the execution of his office, on any pretence whatsoever, every such person being convicted of any such offense, by the sentence of a court martial, shall suffer death; and if any officer, mariner, soldier or other person in the fleet, shall presume to quarrel with any of his superior officers, being in the execution of his office, or shall disobey any lawful command of any of his superior officers; every such person being convicted of any such offence, by the sentence of a court martial, shall suffer death, or such other punishment, as shall, according to the nature and degree of his offence, be inflicted upon him by the sentence of a court martial.

22. If any person in the fleet shall quarrel or fight with any other person in the fleet, or use reproachful or provoking speeches or gestures, tending to make any quarrel or disturbance, he shall, upon being convicted thereof, suffer such punishment as the offence shall deserve, and a court martial shall impose.

23. There shall be no wasteful expense of any powder, shot, ammunition, or other stores in the fleet, nor any embezzlement thereof, but the stores and provisions shall be careful preserved , upon pain of such punishment to be inflicted upon the offenders, abettors, buyers and receivers (being persons subject to naval discipline) as shall be by a court martial found just in that behalf.

24. Every person in the fleet, who shall unlawfully burn or set fire to any magazine or store of powder, or ship, boat, ketch, hoy or vessel, or tackle or furniture thereunto belonging, not then appertaining to an enemy, pirate, or rebel, being convicted of any such offence, by the sentence of a court martial, shall suffer death.

25. Care shall be taken in the conducting and steering of any of His Majesty's ships, that through willfulness, negligence, or other defaults, no ship be stranded, or run upon any rocks or sands, or split or hazarded, upon pain, that such as shall be found guilty therein, be punished by death, or such other punishment, as the offence by a court martial shall be judged to deserve.

26. No person in or belonging to the fleet shall sleep upon his watch, or negligently perform the duty imposed on him, or forsake his station, upon pain of death, or such other punishment as a court martial shall think fit to impose, and as the circumstances of the case shall require.

27. All murders committed by any person in the fleet, shall be punished with death by the sentence of a court martial.

28. If any person in the fleet shall commit the unnatural and detestable sin of buggery and sodomy with man or beast, he shall be punished with death by the sentence of a court martial.

29. All robbery committed by any person in the fleet, shall be punished with death, or otherwise, as a court martial, upon consideration of the circumstances, shall find meet.

30. Every officer or other person in the fleet, who shall knowingly make or sign a false muster or muster book, or who shall command, counsel, or procure the making or signing thereof, or who shall aid or abet any other person in the making or signing thereof, shall, upon proof of any such offence being made before a court martial, be cashiered, and rendered incapable of further employment in His Majesty's naval service.

31. No provost martial belonging to the fleet shall refuse to apprehend any criminal, whom he shall be authorized by legal warrant to apprehend, or to receive or keep any prisoner committed to his charge, or willfully suffer him to escape, being once in his custody, or dismiss him without lawful order, upon pain of such punishment as a court martial shall deem him fit to deserve; and all captains, officers, and others in the fleet, shall do their endeavour to detect, apprehend, and bring to punishment all offenders, and shall assist the officers appointed for that purpose therein, upon pain of being proceeded against, and punished by a court martial, according to the nature and degree of the offence.

32. If any flag officer, captain, or commander, or lieutenant belonging to the fleet, shall be convicted before a court martial of behaving in a scandalous, infamous, cruel, oppressive, or fraudulent manner, unbecoming the character of an officer, he shall be dismissed from His Majesty's service.

33. Every person being in actual service and full pay, and part of the crew in or belonging to any of His Majesty's ships or vessels of war, who shall be guilty of mutiny, desertion, or disobedience to any lawful command, in any part of His Majesty's dominions on shore, when in actual service relative to the fleet, shall be liable to be tried by a court martial, and suffer the like punishment for every such offence, as if the same had been committed at sea on board any of His Majesty's ships or vessels of war.

34. If any person who shall be in the actual service and full pay of His Majesty' ships and vessels of war, shall commit upon the shore, in any place or places out of His Majesty's dominions, any of the crimes punishable by these articles and orders, the person so offending shall be liable to be tried and punished for the same, in like manner, to all intents and purposes, as if the same crimes had been committed at sea, on board any of His Majesty's ships or vessels of war.

35. All other crimes not capital committed by any person or persons in the fleet, which are not mentioned in this act, or for which no punishment is hereby directed to be inflicted, shall be punished by the laws and customs in such cases used at sea.

Tuesday, March 26

The Captain's Background, part I

As told in conversation to Dr. Roberts whilst dining in Plymouth during the repair of the Acasta in April, 1811.

"I was born in Poole, Hampshire on the 15th of June 1754, my father having served as Captain of Marines, most recently aboard the HMS Centurion.  As my family had long been in the service of the Elector of Hanover, German was spoken as much as, if not more, English, in my childhood home, which is why Doctor you found assorted works by Schiller and Göthe amongst the volumes in my cabin.  When I was twelve years of age, through the efforts of my father and the influence of Capt. Augustus Hervey, I embarked on my nautical career as midshipman aboard the HMS Dolphin under the command of Capt. Wallis.  The strict upbringing imposed upon me by my parents, with its keen attention to detail and commitment to duty, proved to be invaluable in allowing me to quickly adapt to the rigors and structure of service in His Majesty's navy.  On the 24th of June, 1766 the Dolphin set sail for the South Pacific, a most remarkable journey of survey and exploration which lasted two years.  My fondest memories are of approaching the southern tip of South America and passing through the Straits of Magellan, during which I had the opportunity to witness first-hand the aboriginal people of Patagonia, several of who dined aboard the Dolphin at the request of the Captain.  During the course of the meal, a question arose as to whether or not one of the natives, who possessed a very refined and gracile face, was female as there was absolutely nothing about their clothing, essentially being identical, as to suggest gender.  Amid much speculation, and wagering amongst the Wardroom members, the native in question was persuaded to open the garment thereby ending the debate!

Upon the return of the Dolphin to Plymouth in May of 1768, the ship, being in a state of repair, was assigned to the Channel Squadron, and I was posted as Master's Mate, a practice not uncommon for those individuals seeking to improve their knowledge and skills in order to receive their Passing Certificate.  After serving in this capacity for four years, I took my examination and although I received my Passing Certificate, as there were no available berths for a newly minted Lieutenant, I remained with the Dolphin in my previous capacity.  Though relatively uneventful, and often times monotonous, service with the Channel Squadron did afford me the opportunity to have ample time ashore, enabling to visit my parents at their home and grounds near Poole, which they christened "Friedlichkeit", and which I was to later inherit.

With the outbreak of civil unrest and rebellion in the American colonies in 1775, I at last received my commission as Third Lieutenant aboard the frigate HMS Melampe under the able command of Capt. William Hotham, whose friendship and patronage has served me well over the years."

Monday, March 25

Royal Navy Surgeon for Hire


History Happens... and it's generally not pretty. 
You're going to want to know where your Doctor is! 

The Doctor presents a dynamic, in-character performance that is as entertaining as it is educational. Young and old are sure to be thrilled when history comes to life with a character that could have come straight from the pages of a history book. 

A dramatic, entertaining and educational first person presentation for kids and adults alike that demonstrates and explains common surgical techniques of the day. Perfect for your School, Church or Historical Event. Topics include bleeding, dentistry, musket ball removal, amputation, even cranial surgery. Discover the true job of a Doctor and Surgeon through the ages and the perils of illness and injury in the not-to-distant past!

The Doctor's strong suit is his ability to demonstrate period-appropriate medical “procedures" for the public. His experience in performing and teaching sleight-of-hand tricks has allowed him to “amputate" a leg, “draw" out a tooth, and tend to “wounded" soldiers in post-battle triage. For the gentler ailments, the Doctor prescribes plain and easy means for persons to cure themselves of all (or most) of the distempers incident to the period, armed with the latest techniques and apocatherian treatments.

The Doctor is always in character, whether he is attending to the public or walking about and interacting with other interpreters. Those who will please to favour him with their employ may depend upon the strictest attendance and attention to Economy.


Contact the Doctor to schedule your appointment today!


Mr. Roberts... was an invaluable addition to our program, and brought 18th century medicine to life through his first person interpretation. Mixed crowds of young and old were captivated by his performances. We were genuinely impressed by Mr. Roberts and his traveling physician character and hope to feature him in future events at the site.
- Diana Overbey
Assistant Director
Historic Bethabara Park
Winston-Salem, North Carolina


[Mr. Roberts'] interaction with the public engages their interest whether they are school children or retirees. Professional, accurate, and entertaining.
-B. L. Rhodes
Museum Education Specialist
Tennessee State Museum
Nashville, Tennessee

You are amazing! Thank you for all that you do to keep history alive!
-Heather Frizzell
2nd & 3rd Grade Teacher
Dayspring Academy,
Greenbrier, Tennessee

Doctor Roberts brought a crucial aspect of life in early Louisville to the event that before was missing and has established himself as a crucial part of our identity.
-Brian Cushing
Vice President
Falls Landing Foundation
Louisville, Kentucky

Mr. Roberts' character was so realistic... it was nearly impossible to tell where the Doctor ended and Mr. Roberts began. His dedication and enthusiasm for living history was very evident. His presentation was a marvelous combination of education and entertainment.
-Mary Norton,
5-8 Gifted Education
Poplar Grove School,
Franklin Special School District
Franklin, Tennessee

[the Doctor] did a wonderful job relating to the children and looked magnificent in costume. I just wanted to stay for the entire session.
-Kathy Rayburn,
Head of School
Currey Ingram Academy
Franklin, Tennessee



A WONDERFUL addition to any program! He not only flawlessly stays in character, but he also peppers his monologue with dry humor that perfectly matches his clipped accent making a performance so believable that the Doctor becomes real.
-Nathan Logsdon
Coordinator
Indiana Territory Festival
Corydon, Indiana

...Thank you for your wonderful presentation to the Jane Austen Society in Louisville. It was both completely informative and equally entertaining.
-Jacqueline Fessard Johnson
JASNA-GL Program Coordinator
Louisville, Kentucky

The whole presentation is fascinating, educational and thoroughly enjoyable. I highly recommend The Doctor for a living history experience that is both entertaining and enlightening.
-Patti Linn
Site Manager
Riverside
the Farnsley-Moremen Landing
Louisville, Kentucky

Dr. Roberts offers a most engaging program that at ones entertains and informs his audience. Of all the programming we offered at the Heritage Fair, his program received some of the most positive feedback. I can definitely recommend Dr. Roberts, and would readily engage him for any future events.

-Alicia Wanless-Berk
Bicentennial Manager for the St. Lawrence Region,
Events performed at:
Spencerville Mill's Heritage Fair
TALL SHIPS® 1812 Tour Brockville
Ontario, Canada

Friday, March 22

Friday's Toast

A calm, clear day today with the first signs of spring finally starting to show. Captain Frymann and the Captains of the other ships on the blockade had the Midshipmen practicing their signal flags for the majority of the afternoon. No sooner would a series of flags be hoisted then the boys would all have out their glasses, eagerly looking for the reply. All manner of mock orders were sent to and fro. 

An uneventful day at sea, followed by an equally uneventful dinner in the Wardroom. After the loyal toast, Lt. Hamilton gave the traditional Friday toast. We all drank with great gusto! We all enjoyed the possibility of prize money, and with several of our officers, the more 'willing foes' the better. 

Friday, March 15

Rules to Observe in Roasting:

In the first place, take great care the spit be very clean; and be sure to clean it with nothing but sand and water. Wash it clean, and wipe it with a dry cloth; for oil, brick dust, and such things, will spoil your meat.

For Pork: Pork must be well done. To every pound allow a quarter of an hour: for example; a joint of twelve pounds weight three hours, and so on; if it be a thin piece of that weight two hours will roast it. You may baste with fine nice dripping. Be sure your fire be very good and brisk; but don't lay your meat too near the fire, for fear of burning or scorching.

"We gots a few porkers when in Bermooda. The Doctor is always fond of a good swine to sup on. Ifn it lasts a week, I will be color'd surprised."


From the book: "The Servant's Directory, Improved" or "House Keeper's Companion; Wherein the duties of the Chamber-maid, Nursery-maid, House-maid, Laundry-maid, Scullion or Undercook, are fully and distinctly explained. To which is added, Cookery and Pickling sufficient to qualify a person to act as THOROUGH SERVANT in any family."

Thursday, March 14

Food at Sea

Mess Deck aboard HMS Trincomalee
The standard allotment of food for sailors for the week is as follows: 

4 pounds of salt beef 
2 pounds of salt pork 
2 pints of pease 
3 pints of oatmeal 
6 ounces of butter 
12 ounces of cheese 

There is also a daily allotment of a pound of bread (generally in the form of Ship's Bisket) and a gallon of beer (or some other type of alcohol depending upon the availability). Other variations include once a week flour, suet (beef fat) and currants or raisins being issued so a "duff" can be made as prevention against scurvy.

Wednesday, March 13

Ship's Bisket

Special thanks to Matthew Cullen for pointing this series out to me.

Tuesday, March 12

From the Surgeon's Personal Log 24

We have departed the comforts of Bermuda once more to rejoin the blockade. With today's steady rains, it has become nearly impossible to stay dry. The water does tend to run down below deck in vast quantities in weather such as this. 

The routine of shipboard life resumes with its watches, duties and meals. I have taken the opportunity to make attempts at completing my forms and catching up on my entries. I have never been good about tending to my paper work as anyone who knows me can attest. 

There have been blessed few injuries or wounds to report of late. Some minor scrapes and bruises associated with women coming aboard at Bermuda and mild drunkenness. I have plastered the cuts and applied salve where required, although I suspect that I will be required again for some of the men once the first symptoms of the 'diseases of Venus' catch up with them. There is always an increase of complaints of that sort whenever the Acasta has dealings with a port.

Thursday, March 7

Images of Life... Ashore!

Lt. Hamilton's set up whilst on duty ashore.
A view of the entire camp.

Tuesday, March 5

19th Century Auditions!

Historic Locust Grove is holding open auditions for costumed interpreters for our Christmastide event. Auditions will be held on 

Sunday, March 24 from 1-4 pm, 
Monday, March 25 from 6-8 pm and 
Sunday, April 14 from 1-4pm 
at Locust Grove. 

Auditions will consists of a monologue and dialogue (sent out ahead of time), as well as some improvisational activities. Christmastide will take place in the afternoon and evening of December 13th and 14th. There will also be opportunities for our costumed interpreter cast to perform at other events throughout the year. 

To schedule an audition slot, please contact Mary Beth Williams at mwilliams@locustgrove.org. 

This event has a set cast list (see below). While we encourage everyone to audition, as with any audition process we cannot guarantee you a place in the cast.

Christmastide will be an interactive event open to the public where we recreate the warmth and magic of the season in an early 19th century American home. The cast will consist of members of the Croghan and Clark families, as well as close friends visiting Locust Grove in the year 1816. The goal of this event is to educate our guests by bringing history to life before their eyes and create the kind of tangible experience they cannot get from a book or on a screen. The cast will achieve this through first person interpretation using a combination of observed conversations and audience interaction as visitors explore the home of William and Lucy Croghan.

In addition to our House Cast, we have a need for in-costume dancers to demonstrate period dances in the Audubon Room of the Visitors Center during Christmastide. Members of the dance company will perform dances from the early 19th century for visitors, speak with visitors, and encourage visitor participation in the dances. Dance instruction and rehearsals will be held prior to Christmastide, as well as workshops about costuming and this time period. Auditions for dance company members will be held later this spring. 

 Contact Mary Beth Williams at mwilliams@locustgrove.org for more information.  

We will also be looking for in-costume guides to lead visitors through their 19th century Christmastide experience. Guides will escort visitors from the Visitors Center to the House and outbuildings, setting the scene as they embark on their journey to the Croghan’s party. Guides must be comfortable speaking with people and willing to learn the history of the House in order to answer visitor’s questions. This is an excellent opportunity for anyone who enjoys public speaking and is comfortable in front of a group. 
 

*House Cast and Dance Company members will receive training throughout the year in the history of the period and the family, as well as workshops on period language and manners, physical characterization and improvisation. There will also be a series of rehearsals in the weeks leading up to the event. Costumes will be provided by Locust Grove, or participants may choose to create their own under the guidance of Locust Grove. All costumes for this event must pass approval prior to the event.

Cast of 1816 Characters:
Croghan Family

GENERAL GEORGE ROGERS CLARK
Age 64 (male between ~ages 55-65) 
(b. November 19, 1752 d. February 13, 1818) 


WILLIAM CROGHAN SR.
Age 64  (male between ~ages 55-65) 
(b. 1752- d. Sept. 1822) 


LUCY CLARK CROGHAN
Age 51 (female between ~ages 40-50) 
(b. September 15, 1765 d. April 4,1838)

JOHN CROGHAN
Age 26 (male between ~ages 20-30), and Age 52 in 1842 (between ~ages 42-52) 
(b. April 23, 1790 d. January 11, 1849) 


GEORGE CROGHAN  
Age 25 (male between ~ages 20-30) 
(b. November 15, 1791 d. January 8, 1849)

WILLIAM CROGHAN JR.
Age 22 (male between ~ages 18-25) 
(b. January 2, 1794 d. September 1850) 


ANN CROGHAN  
Age 19  (female between ~ages 16-20) 
(b. October 20, 1797 d. April 1846) 


ELIZABETH (ELIZA) CROGHAN  
Age 15 (female between ~ages 12-16) 
(b. April 9, 1801 d. July 12, 1833)

CHARLES CROGHAN  
Age 14 (male between ~ages 12-16) 
(b. June 19 1802 d. October 1832) 


NICHOLAS CROGHAN
Age 14 (male between ~ages 12-16) 
(b. June 19, 1802 d. May 1825) (twin brother of Charles) 


EDMUND CROGHAN  
Age 11 (male between ~ages 10-15) 
(b. September 12, 1805 d. September 1825) 


NANNY THE COOK
(African-American female)



BUTLER/HOUSE SLAVE
(African-American male)

KITT
Age ~46 (African-American male between ~ages 40-50)
 (b c. 1770-c. 1835)

Clark Family and Close Friends

OWEN GWATHMEY  
Age 63 (male between ~ages 55-65)
(b. November 25,1753 d. December 1, 1830)



ANN CLARK GWATHMEY  
(m. Owen) Age 61 (female between ~ages 50-60) 
(b. July 14, 1755 d. September 1822)



FANNY FITZHUGH  
Age 43 (female between ~ages 35-45) 
(b. January 20, 1773 d. July 1825)

RICHARD CLOUGH ANDERSON  
Age 66 (male between ~ages 55-65) 
(b. January 12, 1750 d. October16, 1826)



ANN MARSHALL ANDERSON  
Age 37 (female between ~ages 30-40) 
(b. November 20, 1779 d. August 25, 1854)



RICHARD TAYOR  
Age 70 (male between ~ages 60-70) 
(b. April 3, 1744 d. January 19, 1829)



SARAH TAYLOR  
Age 56 (female between ~ages 45-55) 
(b. 1760 d. 1822)


ZACHARY TAYLOR  
(Son of Richard) Age 32 (male between ~ages 25-33) 
(b. November 24, 1784 d. July 9, 1850)



MARGARET “PEGGY” TAYLOR
(m. Zachary) Age 28 (female between ~ages 25-33) 
(b. September 21, 1788 d. August 14, 1852)



SARAH BAILEY TAYLOR
(Dau. of Richard) Age 17 (female between ~ages 15-19)
 (b. 1799 d. )



EMILY RICHARD TAYLOR
(Dau. of Richard) Age 15 (female between ~ages 13-17) 
(b. 1801 d. )

DR. RICHARD FERGUSON  
Age 47 (male between ~ages 40-50) 
(b. 1769 d.1853)

DR. HENRY MCMURTRIE
Age 23 (male between ~ages 20-25) 
(b. 1793 d. 1865)

AARON FONTAINE
Age 63 (male between ~ages 55-65) 
(b. November 30, 1753- d. April 1823)



JUDGE FORTUNATUS COSBY
Age 49 (male between ~ages 40-50)
(b. December 20, 1767 d. October 19, 1846)

MARY ANN FONTAINE
(m. Fortunatus) Age ~37 (female between ~ages 30-40)
 (b. ca. 1779)

ELIZA SYDNOR COSBY
(Dau of Fortunatus) Age 17 (female between ~ages 15-19)
 (b. 1799 d. )

Monday, March 4

Acasta Event Announcement

The Fair at New Boston
August 31 & September 1, 2013
10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Both Days
George Rogers Clark Park, Springfield, OH

Scenario: It's 1813 and the war is in full swing. Officers and Sailors from the HMS Acasta have come to the fair at New Boston to recruit more men for His Majesty's Navy. There are quotas to meet, and if the Acastas can't get enough men to volunteer to join, they'll get what they need with a press gang.

A Royal Navy Lieutenant from the Acasta, accompanied by a group of surly looking Sailors armed with belaying pins and clubs make up the press gang. This gang will prowl the streets, lanes and taverns of New Boston in search of fresh recruits.

This is a fantastic educational and entertainment opportunity for the guests to the fair, a chance for them to see something that they've never seen before, but also to participate! This scenario can involve paying guests as well as the costumed participants and shouldn't last more than 10-15 minutes for those that are 'impressed' by the gang, but can certainly last longer for those that are interested.

Friday, March 1

March Business

HMS Acasta website report for March. 

At the end of February, the site had over 26,250 hits with the top 4 countries to view the site continuing to be the United States, China, the United Kingdom and Germany. There was some spambot activity that seems based out of Russia of late that has artificially inflated that number a bit. For some odd reason, Russian spambots seem to love Mr. Midshipman Raley and his posts!

If you enjoy reading the adventures of the HMS Acasta, be certain to become an honorary member of the crew. This is an easy way to show us that you're out there and paying attention. It is a simple matter really, there is a blue button... NOW at the very bottom of this very page that will allow you to join. 

And Second, I would ask that you comment from time to time on the posts that interest you the most. This is an excellent way to let the crew of the Acasta know what you, the reader, is the most interested in seeing. It is always most gratifying to know what the readers like. For those of you that have commented in the past, we thank you for you support and interest!

If you find a post that you are particularly fond of... be sure to share a link with your friends, over Facebook, Tumblr, Google Plus, etc. so they can enjoy it too!

Don't be content to LURK... participate!

HOW can you participate you ask? Great question... read on!

If you're a historical reenactor with an interest in the Royal Navy circa 1800-1812, you might be just the person we're looking for! Find out more about joining the Acasta HERE.

OR, if you like to write, you can participate in our MAIL PACKET project, wherein you write a period style letter to one of the crew and it gets published AND potentially answered here on the Acasta site. Be sure to click on the link for more details and EXAMPLES of some of the letters we've gotten thus far.

 WHERE CAN I SEE THE ACASTAS IN PERSON?

Great question. In this Present Year, the Acastas will be ashore at the following events:

6th annual  Jane Austen Festival
July 20th & 21st, 2013
Louisville, KY.
www.jasnalouisville.com

The Fair at New Boston
August 31 & September 1, 2013
10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Both Days
George Rogers Clark Park, Springfield, OH 
www.fairatnewboston.org

Mississinewa 1812
October 11-13
Marion, Indiana

The Acasta log is generally updated every weekday at 8am CST, visit back often, and tell your History/Royal Navy friends to visit us.

Thanks for reading!