Thursday, April 18

Poor, Unfortunate Darby


Screen shot taken from: The Royal Naval and Military Calendar:
And National Record for 1821. By George Mackenzie

Wednesday, April 17

Meet Francis Decimus Hastings


HASTINGS.
Acasta Midshipman under Capt. Kerr, c.1811.

Francis Decimus Hastings entered the Navy, 19 Aug. 1807, as Third-cl. Vol., on board the Temeraire 98, Capts. Sir Chas. Hamilton and Edw. Sneyd Clay, successively stationed in the Channel and Baltic. In June, 1809, having attained the rating of Midshipman a few months previously, he removed to the Amethyst 36, Capt. Jacob Walton, with whom he appears to have been employed on Home service until wrecked in Plymouth Sound 16 Feb. 1811. He then joined, for a short period, the Acasta 40, Capt. Alex. Robt. Kerr ; after which we find him, until Aug. 1815, employed, on the Spanish, North American, Jamaica, and Home stations, latterly as Master's Mate, in the Iris 38, Capt. Hood Hanway Christian, St. Domingo 74, flag-ship of Sir John Borlase Warren, Emulous brig, Capt. Wm. M'Kenzie Godfrey, and Argo 44, and Ville de Paris 110, bearing the flags of Rear-Admiral Wm. Brown and Lord Keith.

Source: A NAVAL BIOGRAPHICAL DICTIONARY: COMPRISING THE LIFE AND SERVICES OF EVERY LIVING OFFICER IN HER MAJESTY'S NAVY, FROM THE RANK OF ADMIRAL OF THE FLEET TO THAT OF LIEUTENANT, INCLUSIVE. Compiled from Authentic and Family Documents. BY WILLIAM E. O'BYRNE, ESQ.
LONDON: JOHN MURRAY, ALBEMARLE STREET, PUBLISHER TO THE ADMIRALTY. 1849.


Above image is a cropped version of "Portrait of Augustus Leopold Kuper as a midshipman, in the year he entered the Royal Navy at the age of fourteen."
by FISCHER, T. Paul. London: June, 1823.

Tuesday, April 16

George Francis Seymour, Volunteer First Class

A portrait miniature of a young boy, thought to be
Sir George Francis Seymour (1787-1870), leaning on
an anchor, a ship in the distance by Richard Cosway,
Watercolour on ivory, 18th Century, Oval, 89mm (3 ½ in.) high
SEYMOUR, Kt., C.B., G.C.H.
Acasta Volunteer First Class under Capt. Fellowes, c.1802, aged approx 15.

Sir George Francis Seymour, born in Sept. 1787, is eldest son of the late Vice-Admiral Lord Hugh Seymour (fifth son of Francis, first Marquess of Hertford, K.G.) by Anne Horatia, third daughter of James, second Earl of Waldegrave...

This officer entered the Navy, 10 Oct. 1797, as Fst.-cl. Vol., on board the Princess Augusta yacht, Capt. Edw. Riou, lying in the river Thames; and from March, 1798, until May, 1802, was employed on the Channel and West India stations, the last two years and four months in the capacity of Midshipman, in the Sanspareil 80, Prince of Wales 98, and Sanspareil again, all flag-ships of his father, and Acasta 40, Capt. Edw. Fellowes. In the Prince of Wales he witnessed the surrender of Surinam in Aug. 1799 ; and in the Acasta he assisted in making a variety of prizes. He was subsequently, in the course of 1802-3, employed on the Home, Newfoundland, and Mediterranean stations, in the Endymion 40, Capt. John Larmour, Isis 50, hearing the flag of Vice-Admiral Jas. Gamhier, Endymion a second time, Capt. Hon. Chas. Paget, and Victory 100, bearing the flag of Lord Nelson...

...In 1818 Sir G. F. Seymour was appointed by his uncle, the Marquess of Hertford, then Lord Chamberlain, Serjeant-at-Arms to the House of Lords. From 4 Aug. 1830 until he resigned, 11 Nov. following, he was a Naval Aide-de-Camp to William IV.; under whom he filled the office of Master of the Robes from 13 Sept. 1830 until the period of his death.
Mezzotint of Admiral,
Sir George Francis Seymour
(1787-1870), Admiral of the Fleet.

Source: A NAVAL BIOGRAPHICAL DICTIONARY: COMPRISING THE LIFE AND SERVICES OF EVERY LIVING OFFICER IN HER MAJESTY'S NAVY, FROM THE RANK OF ADMIRAL OF THE FLEET TO THAT OF LIEUTENANT, INCLUSIVE. Compiled from Authentic and Family Documents. BY WILLIAM E. O'BYRNE, ESQ.
LONDON: JOHN MURRAY, ALBEMARLE STREET, PUBLISHER TO THE ADMIRALTY. 1849.

Monday, April 15

Lt. John Shepherd

SHEPHERD.
Acasta Lieutenant under Capt. Kerr, 10 July 1813 - July 1815.

John Shepherd (b) entered the Navy, 20 Aug. 1805, as Fst.-cl. Vol., on board the Addacious 74, Capt. John Lawford, with whom he continued employed in the Channel in the Impetdeux 74 until Oct. 1806. Between Feb. 1807 and Sept. 1811 he served off Eochefort and on the coast of Ireland, as Midshipman and Master's Mate, in the Eurydice, Druid, and Endimion frigates, all commanded by Capt. Sir Wm. Bolton. He then joined the Recruit sloop, Capt. Humphrey Fleming Senhouse, and Africa 64, flag-ship of Vice-Admiral Herbert Sawyer, both on the Halifax station; where he was made Lieutenant, 2 Feb. 1813, into the Spartan 38, Capt. Edw. Pelham Brenton, and transferred, 10 July following, to the Acasta 40, Capt. Alex. Robt. Kerr. He left that ship in July, 1815 ; was next, in April, 1823, and Aug. 1825, appointed to the Rifleman 18, Capt. Jas. Montagu, and Druid 46, Capt. Sam. Chambers, on the North American and Jamaica stations ; attained the rank of Commander 28 Aug. 1828 ; was nominated, 30 March, 1829, and (after eight months of half-pay) 7 April, 1831, Second-Captain of the Bauham 50, bearing the flag of Hon. Chas. Elphinstone Fleeming in the West Indies, and Donegal 78, Capts. John Dick and Arthur Fanshawe, on the Mediterranean and Lisbon stations, where he served until Aug. 1833; and from 4 April, 1837, until posted, 26 Oct. 1840, commanded the Sparrowhawk 16,'on the coast of North America and at the Cape of Good Hope. From 14 May until 7 Oct. 1846 he ofiiciated as Captain, pro tern,, of the St. Vincent 120, bearing the broad pendant of Sir Fras. Aug. Collier in the Channel ; and since 4 Dec. 1847 he has been in command of the Inconstant 36, on the south-east coast of America.

Source: A NAVAL BIOGRAPHICAL DICTIONARY: COMPRISING THE LIFE AND SERVICES OF EVERY LIVING OFFICER IN HER MAJESTY'S NAVY, FROM THE RANK OF ADMIRAL OF THE FLEET TO THAT OF LIEUTENANT, INCLUSIVE. Compiled from Authentic and Family Documents. BY WILLIAM E. O'BYRNE, ESQ.
LONDON: JOHN MURRAY, ALBEMARLE STREET, PUBLISHER TO THE ADMIRALTY. 1849.

Friday, April 12

Midshipman William Bowles

BOWLES, C.B., M.P.
Acasta Midshipman under Capts. Fellowes & Wood.

William Bowles, born in 1780, is eldest son of Wm. Bowles, Esq., of Heale House, co. Wilts, by Dinah, daughter of the late Sir Thos. Frankland, R.N., Admiral of the White ; nephew of the late Wm. Frankland, Esq., M.P., a Lord of the Admiralty, and of the late Sir Boyle Roche, Bart. ; and first cousin of the present Capts. Edw. Augustus and Chas. Colville Frankland, and Henry Gosset, R.N.

This officer entered the Navy, 9 Sept. 1796, as Fst.-cl. Vol., on board the Theseus 74, Capts. Augustus Montgomery and John Aylmer, employed in the Channel and off Cadiz ; removed with the latter officer, as Midshipman, in June, 1797, to the Captain 74 ; served, from May, 1798, to Nov. 1800, in the Daphne 20, Capts. Sir Chas. Lindsay and Rich. Matson, on the North Sea and West India stations ; then returned home in the Hydra frigate, Capt. Sir Fras. Laforey ; and after a consecutive attachment to the Royal William, Capt. Fras. Pickmore, lying at Spithead, Acasta frigate, Capts. Edw. Fellowes and Jas. Athol Wood, in the Mediterranean, and Driver sloop, Capt. Fras. Wm. Fane, was appointed, 22 July, 1803, Acting-Lieutenant of the Cambrian 40, Capts. Barclay and John Poo Beresford, on the Halifax station, where he was confirmed by commission dated on 30 of the following Aug. Mr. Bowles, whom we next find serving in the Leander 50, flag-ship of Sir Andrew Mitchell, and Milan 38, Capt. Sir Robt. Laurie, both on the coast of North America, was promoted to the rank of Commander 22 Jan. 1806...

Source: A NAVAL BIOGRAPHICAL DICTIONARY: COMPRISING THE LIFE AND SERVICES OF EVERY LIVING OFFICER IN HER MAJESTY'S NAVY, FROM THE RANK OF ADMIRAL OF THE FLEET TO THAT OF LIEUTENANT, INCLUSIVE. Compiled from Authentic and Family Documents. BY WILLIAM E. O'BYRNE, ESQ.
LONDON: JOHN MURRAY, ALBEMARLE STREET, PUBLISHER TO THE ADMIRALTY. 1849.

Thursday, April 11

Jefferson and the Tripoli Pirates

Today's book review in miniature is by Acasta member Nick Weremeichik

“Thomas Jefferson and the Tripoli Pirates: The Forgotten War That Changed American History” by Brian Kilmeade and Don Yaeger

While focusing on Federal America, this book gives great insight to the Mediterranean trade network from 1801-05. The Barbary states of Tunis, Algiers, Morocco and Tripoli were taking tribute money in exchange for safe passage to trade in the Mediterranean. Muslim North Africa has been impressing sailors for a long time (including Britons) but now involved Americans also. This book tells how America’s first international war (and navy) came about, the birth of the US Marines and state of the Mediterranean during the turn of the 19th century. The Battle of the Nile and Napoleon’s African campaign gets some mention, but the focus is on “them Yanks” and the North African pirates. 
The book reads like a novel, and walks you through this obscure history almost day by day. Plenty of sources to substantiate this work, and adds some greater context to the period we portray. I enjoyed it, it was a quick read as the pages start turning. Lots of information I didn’t know before. A for-sure recommendation.


Wednesday, April 10

Prickly Heat and how to Cure it



     ...It consists of small red spots, somewhat resembling fleabites, and chiefly spread over those parts of the body which are covered with clothes, particularly the inside of the arms, thighs, breast, and forehead. This eruption is attended with a very troublesome itching, which is increased by warm liquids, or warm clothing. The spots are also rendered more numerous by the same means. This affection, though inconvenient, is considered as a mark of high health; and, in consequence of this idea, many persons suffer great anxiety, either on its disappearance, or because they have not so extensive an eruption of it as others. Hence an improper mode of treatment is often adopted by the patients themselves, who indulge in warm diluent liquors, which increase the eruption, and render the itching still more uncomfortable. The duration of this eruption, when left to itself, is very uncertain; at times it disappears entirely in a few minutes, and re-appears almost immediately after. The disease gradually ceases in proportion as the person becomes accustomed to the climate. With respect; to the treatment, all the precaution that is necessary is to keep moderately cool, to avoid drinking warm liquors when the itching is severe, and to take occasionally a gentle dose of salts.

Taken from: The Naval Surgeon Comprising the Entire Duties of Professional Men at Sea
By William Turnbull
1806

Page 236-237